The Moths of Suffolk
2128 Double Square-spot, Xestia triangulum, (Hufnagel, 1766)

National Status : Common

Local Status : Resident (SMP Status 1)

Distribution and abundance : Widespread and common

Habitats : In a wide variety, including woodland, hedgerows, fens, grassland, heathland and gardens

Flight Period : Single-brooded; June to mid-August

Larval foodplants : Various herbaceous plants - found locally on Honeysuckle and hawthorns

Morley's Final Catalogue : Suffolk, teste W. C. Hewitson Esq. (Stephens, Illust. ii, 1829,p.133); Monks Soham. If this and the two former species (referring to Purple Clay and Square-spotted Clay) be not actually mere forms of but one, it is most remarkable with what similarity and interassociation they all three occur in Suffolk.

Wingspan details : Forewing 17-19mm, Wingspan 36-46mm

Identification

Confusion species
    AdultTriple-spotted Clay, Xestia ditrapezium
Square-spotted Clay, Xestia rhomboidea

Compare confusion species
    Adult

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Bred from larva - Kenton hills, Suffolk (iv.2003) © N Sherman

Flight chart
JFMAMJJASOND
31 100 1

Life history chart
JFMAMJJASOND
larval diapause larval diapause larval diapause larva pupa imago imago ova larva larval diapause larval diapause larval diapause

Further Photographs

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Kenton Hills (28.iii.2003) © A Prichard
Found at night by torchlight searching nettles - Kenton Hills, Suffolk (iv.2003) © N Sherman
Eye, Suffolk (2.vi.2009) © Paul Kitchener
 
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Staverton, Suffolk (19.vi.2009) © A Prichard
Ipswich, Suffolk (25.vi.2012) © A Prichard
Ipswich, Suffolk (25.vi.2012) © A Prichard
 
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Ipswich, Suffolk (26.vi.2015) © Neil Sherman